Lakewood United

Vote No on 200

Opponents of 200

All across Lakewood citizens and civic leaders are opposing Question 200. 200 will increase property taxes, drive-up the cost of rent, and impose a mountain of new regulations, mandates and penalties on Lakewood citizens. That’s why Republicans, Democrats and Independents across Lakewood are coming together to oppose Question 200.

  • Alameda Connects
  • Mayor Adam Paul
  • Commissioner Lesley Dahlkemper
  • Norma Anderson
  • Amy Attwoord
  • Bob Beauprez
  • Mike Branigan
  • Rock Carter
  • Cindy Cecil
  • Kurtis Cecil
  • John Darrow
  • Steve Dorman
  • Rob Fairbank
  • Eva Frickle
  • Michael Gifford
  • Gail Hamilton, Commercial Advisors LLC
  • Shawn Hegarty
  • Former Sen. Cheri Jahn
  • Sen. Andy Kerr
  • Mike Kopp
  • Philip Kyburz
  • Rep. Colin Larson
  • Anthony Martuscello, Westfax Brewery
  • Jerry Natividad
  • Jenn Penn
  • Penn Pfiffner
  • Brenda Bronson
  • Kathy Stapleton
  • Tom Murray, Lakewood Business Leader
  • Marta Murray, Lakewood Resident
  • Peter Powers, Lakewood Community and Business Leader
  • Tom Quinn, Lakewood Business Leader
  • Steven Silvers, Lakewood Business Leader
  • CASA of Jefferson and Gilpin Counties
  • Family Tree Inc.
  • Jefferson County Economic Development Corporation
  • West Chamber
  • West Colfax Community Association
  • West Metro Fire Protection District
  • Fraternal Order of Police – 21 Lakewood Police Lodge
  • Habitat for Humanity
  • Union Corridor Professionals
  • Colorado Building & Construction Trades Council
  • UFCW – Local 7
  • Rep. Chris Kennedy
  • Commissioner Casey Tighe
  • lan Philp
  • Peter Powers
  • Tom Quinn
  • Leonard Rabinovich
  • LaDawn Sperling
  • Commissioner Libby Szabo
  • Rep. Kerry Tipper
  • Rep. Max Tyler
  • Frank Teunissen
  • Kathleen Vigil
  • Dick Wadhams
  • Terrence Weaver
  • Ambassador Sam H. Zakhem
  • Joni Inman, Lakewood Business Leader
  • Steve Katich, Lakewood Business Leader
  • Karen Kellen, Lakewood Business Leader
  • Craig Meis, Lakewood Business Leader

QUESTION 200 IS DECEIVING

When you get your ballot, there will be two documents. One is the ballot question, which makes the initiative seem short and sweet, and a second document that includes pages and pages of language describing what the measure actually does. Please read the long and complicated language and not just the short sentence that is the ballot question. When you do, you’ll understand the simple ballot question has very little resemblance to what Question 200 would actually do. It is wrong for the proponents of this measure to try to hide the true meaning of 200. That alone is reason to Vote NO on Question 200.

A CARBON-COPY OF FAILED ANTI-GROWTH POLICIES

Growth controls like Question 200 have been tried before in cities like San Francisco and Seattle. They have only succeeded in making the affordable housing crisis in those cities much worse, making life harder for working families and forcing some of them to leave. Here in Colorado, Boulder has a similar anti-growth program that dramatically drives up the cost of living, forcing much of the city’s workforce to live elsewhere and drive long distances to their jobs. But if you look closely at Question 200, it reads almost exactly like Boulder’s cap on residential growth – in fact, the most important provisions are literally cut and pasted from Boulder’s anti-housing permit policy. But why should Lakewood copy failed policies from other cities that eliminate affordable housing, favor the wealthy, and make working families unwelcome? That’s not the kind of community we are.

QUESTION 200’S UNINTENDED CONSEQUENCES – HIGHER PROPERTY TAXES, GRIDLOCKED TRAFFIC

So what would 200 do? It would establish an extremely complicated set of rules (and exceptions to rules, and exception to exceptions to rules) that address how new homes and housing can be built. Look to other cities like San Francisco, Seattle and Boulder for the consequences. The most obvious impact – the cost of housing and rent payments go through the roof. If you own a home in Lakewood already, you’ll pay much higher property taxes too. Then there are the traffic impacts. When you force the men and women who work in Lakewood to live outside our city, you make congestion on our major roadways worse. Have you ever wondered why Highway 36 to Boulder is practically a parking lot during peak hours? Because when teachers and firefighters, small business owners and young professionals can’t afford to live there, they are forced to commute from other communities, meaning more motorists, more driving time and more traffic on city streets and major roads. Make no mistake, if Question 200 passes, Lakewood’s existing traffic problems will be dramatically worse.

A FIELD DAY FOR LAWYERS AND LOBBYISTS

Because the measure is so complicated, it will greatly favor businesses and individuals who have enough money to hire lawyers and lobbyists. Citizens shouldn’t need a lawyer and a lobbyist to get a building permit from the city of Lakewood.

A BLOW TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING

Imposing rigid growth controls on the residential housing market will limit supply and inevitably drive up the cost of housing. Higher rents, mortgage payments and property taxes will hurt working families and seniors the most. It’s already to expensive to live in Lakewood. Question 200 will take our cost of living and make it dramatically higher.

TEACHERS, FIREFIGHTERS, POLICE AND OTHER WORKING FAMILIES HIT THE HARDEST

If we drive up the cost of living even more with this anti-growth ballot measure, our teachers, firefighters, police and other working families will have to move outside the city and commute to their jobs. As was noted earlier, by forcing working families out of the community where they work, ironically, the anti-growth measure encourages sprawl and exacerbates traffic and congestion challenges. Bottom line – anti-growth measures like the one being proposed in Lakewood hit working class people hardest.

QUESTION 200 WOULD HAVE STOPPED POPULAR DEVELOPMENTS

If we had imposed anti-growth policies in the past, popular amenities like Bel-Mar and Colorado Mills would never have come to Lakewood. Passing the anti-growth ballot measure now would threaten worthy projects for the future, like the revitalization of West Colfax. If we want new amenities, we need to support and manage new growth, not punish it.

WILL INCREASE ASSESSED VALUATIONS AND PROPERTY TAX BILLS

If we limit Lakewood’s housing supply, there’s just no doubt about it — assessed valuations and property tax bills will skyrocket. The good news is, your home will be worth more. The bad news is, your property tax bills will increase dramatically. Here again, this spike in property taxes will hit working families and seniors on fixed incomes the hardest. Higher property taxes will make it harder to sell your house too.